Five Ways To Create Supportive Environments For Diabetics

Five Ways To Create Supportive Environments For Diabetics

 

You have a demanding responsibility. You need much more support than you might realize to conquer Diabetes. I mean much, much more.

Managing Diabetes across a lifetime requires persistence and help to achieve the tight control to avoid serious complications. Making lifestyle changes requires a tremendous amount of support. Don’t kid yourself. Diabetes becomes a problem after many years. Controlling it a few months here or there is not enough.

Using only will power to get the tight control is extremely difficult over a lifetime. We do want to avoid those serious complications, don’t we? After 21 years of trying to maintain my blood glucose levels, I can say with great confidence that you need support and lots of it.

Most of the medical advice and new products is making it even harder. The mass media statistics are making it more despairing. Trying to use willpower all the time will lead to burn out with great disappointment and further aggravating your Diabetes.  Nor will doctor’s lectures or the media messages do much good over the long-haul. There is a tendency to blame ourselves for going off our tight control, which just aggravates our ability to achieve tight control. You need support to help keep you on track. You need something else or someone else to do some or more of the work.

Designing supportive environments allows your environments to do the work. Rather than pushing using will power and trying harder you want to focus on being guided, pulled, and supported. This is an unfamiliar concept to many and I agree it sounds a bit abstract. However, this can be one of the most powerful tool you have to control your blood sugar over time. With designed environments, willpower/commitment is minimized or optional.

This is so unfamiliar, there needs to be information about designing supportive environments to help control your Diabetes. Let me start with giving you a few facts about supportive environments.

  1. Set up your environments as partners. Your environments can be designed to make things easier for you, to automate processes or personal habits. Environments work as a system so that you don’t have to do all the thinking and working. They keep you responding and growing even when you don’t want to. They help you do more work with less effort and attention. Being deliberate about your environments creates a relationship with them – By creating a relationship with your environments, they become much more than tools.

 

  1. Environments are everywhere. For example, people, technological systems, the television, office space, R&D teams, pets, school courses, special interest groups, relationships, family, friends, colleagues, physical home office, ideas, concepts, information, energy, feelings, values, Self- body, spirit, gifts, networks – web, and customers.

 

  1. Environments are easier on you. Relying on willpower to get things done can often be at the cost of physical or mental strain and stress if relied on too long. Environments, on the other hand, reduce the stress by setting things up to get done more easily, with less effort.

 

Here are five examples how you can design your environments to support your tight control on your Diabetes.

  1. Minimize or Eliminate the Massive Amount of Food Temptations

Giving into food temptations can wreak havoc and is one of my weakest failings. Do not underestimate the level of temptation. It is in every supermarket, restaurant, and home. Temptation is around every corner.

Controlling our temptations can have a significant improvement to our blood glucose control.

Simple examples of an environment design is to make sure that foods are either absence or guaranteed to be good.

Absence is not having food you should not eat in the house. This is one of the easiest and best ways to controlling blood sugar. Another absence is not having accessed to foods that others want. Easier said than done. It worked very well when I was single, not so well later on.

You can guarantee it is good by packaging the food ahead of time to assure you have the right portions and carbs.

Some difficulties can occur when some family members who are not Diabetics and do not want to eat what you need to eat. And they don’t want to have two different meals to prepare.  Packaging ahead of time and add it to the dinner table at the same time helps.

Another way to guarantee is moving towards non-processed foods. Processed foods are very tempting and can create havoc with your weight and Diabetes. They are usually less expensive, and have ingredients that are addictive.  Processed foods are one of the causes of being overweight. Being overweight can affect your Diabetes significantly. Start bringing more and more non-processed food into your eating. Shop at stores where the temptation is the lowest, like a health food store. This will allow you to control what you are going to eat and minimize violations.

  1. Get Others To Help Out By Doing Some Of The Work

One of your environments are the relationships you have. Let your spouse/friend see your blood glucose numbers and hold you accountable. This includes your A1C numbers. This will stop some of the times you are not paying great deal of attention to your testing.  Work with them to keep you on track.

Let your doctors see your numbers. Provide a printout of what you have to your doctor. Make the printout easy for the doctor to see the results quickly.

Get the doctor to give you any new concepts or information they recently learned about Diabetes. Less research for you. You can solicit help on the Internet to answer your requests.

Sign up for a forum and connect with other Diabetics. Toss our questions and let them help you.

Get psychological and emotional support on a regular basis

Hire an accountability coach. A coach can keep you on track. Help you establish the daily habits you will need. You would meet for a few minutes to go over the results and actions.

  1. Leverage Positive Ideas and Concepts

Look at the 8 million people that have controlled their diabetes rather than focus om the 415 million people with the potential for the consequences of Diabetes.  

Surround yourself with positive people. Especially ones who are diabetic. Schedule a regular amount of time to talk to them.

Surround yourself with new ideas instead of recycling your old beliefs. It will help you evolve. Create a group of friends that you can talk to about new ideas or get on a forum or create a forum.

Here are a few concepts that could help you:

  1. Truly normal blood sugars should stay under 120 mg/dl at all times.
  2. Eating more smaller meals during the day will give you the best results.
  3. Package these smaller meals ahead of time so there is not temptation otherwise.
  4. Low carbs per meal is the best way to stop sugar fluctuations
  5. Surround yourself with new ideas instead of recycling your old beliefs
  6. Choose a goal or vision that is bigger than you are. Be pulled forward by it, instead of pushing yourself.
  7. Constantly experiment until you do so naturally and effortlessly You may need to alter your relationship with risk in order to enjoy experimentation.

  

  1. Keep Your Measuring Equipment In Plain Sight, So You Don’t Forget to Take Measurements.

Keep your glucose monitor and test strips available and in plain sight so you don’t forget to use them.

Develop set times to take your measurements.

Keeping track of your measurements over time with automated tools with the results from your meter. You can also put the results on a computer I use a Windows Excel program to do all the calculations I want.

Put a chart of your results on your wall so you can see. Make the chart convenient to see. So, the environment is reminding you to focus on it every time you look that way.

 

  1. Using Technology To Create Supportive Environments.

Send yourself an email to remind you to take your A1C test. Put alarms and alerts on your calendars to help out.

Keep track of your A1C numbers over time. Get your doctor to comment on the results. Tell the doctor that you are going to do this and that they should hold you accountable.

Use continuous glucose monitoring equipment to track the details of your blood sugar across time. If it makes sense and is affordable for you.

Find the really big difficulties and time wasting parts, and look for a technology that can help.

There is a steep learning curve and videos can help. You can try Udemy. Click here. Or You Tube. Click here.

Utilize the Internet.

Educational Resources

If you don’t have your Diabetes education paid for from your medical plan, sign up for an inexpensive energetic presentation Diabetes, without becoming a super expert. Try Udemy video  Click Here To Check It Out!

Ask Doctor Bernstein’s Teleseminar are free. Whatever questions you have, he will answer them. Plus, you get to hear all the questions other Diabetics raise that might be applicable to you. Click Here to register

Here are a few books:

  • Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide To Achieving Normal Blood Sugar by Richard K. Bernstein. He is the best for low carb diet and managing normal blood sugar levels. Click here 
  • Blood Sugar 101: What They Don’t Tell You About Diabetes Jenny Ruhl. She has done wonderful research and has done a detailed analysis and it is worth a read. Click here.
  • The Biography of Diabetes by Doctor Robert Tattersoll. This book will give you a sense of a brief medical history of Diabetes from the begging. Click here.

Educating yourself on Diabetes will be a step in taking responsibility for it.

There are many other resources we will bring up in future posts.

What’s Coming Next

We will be writing posts on the effects of belief systems, stress, lifestyle changes, questions for doctors, leading healthcare professionals and consequences of not taking responsibility.  These ae just a few. You can make suggestion where you might want us to go next. Just put it in the comments.

  Help Spread the Word

Let’s get more people involved in the conversation. Let’s learn from each other

Be well and take charge…

 

4 Reasons Why You Need To Take Responsible For Your Diabetes

4 Reasons Why You Need To Take Responsible For Your Diabetes

Just like you, I was brought up to believe that doctors had the answers. Has complexity changed that belief?

Who is the most important person on your health team? Believe it or not, it is you!

Here are three quotes to kick us off.

A quote from Guenther Jonitz, president of the Berlin Chamber of Physicians. “What Doctors Need to Know? Medicine today resembles the church in the sixteenth century. What we need is a reformation. Few doctors are trained to judge and evaluate scientific studies. I myself chose to be trained as a surgeon to avoid two things: statistics and psychology. Now I realize that both are indispensable. We have a disjointed healthcare system. I am appalled at what people tend to believe.”

A quote from Dr Marcia Angell, who was the editor of the New England Journal of Medicine for two decades. This was, and remains, the single most powerful and influential medical journal in the world.   “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgment of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of The New England Journal of Medicine.”

A quote from Samuel Johnson: “And take the case of a man who is ill. I call two physicians: they differ in opinion. I am not to lie down and die between them: I must do something”.

With these kinds of indictments, where does that leave you. Well it is up to you to test and search for the ones you can trust.  It’s your responsibility.

Here are 4 reasons why you need to take responsibility yourselves.

  1. Diabetes Is Very Complex But More Importantly Very Individualized

Did you know, Diabetes is very complex not only for us but for doctors and researchers. Diabetes is not a single disease but a syndrome with at least fifty possible major causes. Over 170 new diabetics drugs are in development, according to a recent PhRMA magazine making it even more complex for the us and our doctors. Click here to see the magazine article. This complexity is only the biomedical part. There is the psychological and the behavioral parts needed to maintain tight control over many years adding to the overall complexity.

Diabetes decisions are complex having substantial consequences and involve important uncertainties and trade-offs. The uncertainties may be about the diagnosis, the accuracy of available diagnostic tests, the effects of treatment. With such complex decisions, it can be difficult to comprehend it all, let alone to compare them to other alternatives.

Diabetes’ effect on us is incredibly individual. Too much of what is written about Diabetes implies it is one disease with a few causes. This overgeneralization is grossly misleading and can be damaging. Your stress levels, your history, your emotions that drive to eat more, your beliefs, your level of disappointment can have an effect on your Diabetes. We need to look at these individual aspects of ourselves. We need to get this individual information in front of your doctors to best treat us. The benefit is that you get to treat more accurately your needed control on your Diabetes. Swallowing general information can lead to a wrong decision frustrating your ability to tighten your blood control. For example, it might not be eating improperly or poor exercise it might simple be we have an infection or a low-grade fever or a depression.

Rather than accepting complex overgeneralizations about Diabetes, as popular it maybe, the best and most accurate would be to test yourself and have your doctor review your tests. The key factor is about taking care of you. Doctors are too focused on their theories and have little time for you.

I would love to have my doctors spend more individual time with me, but that is not going to happen. I would also love if my doctors do more research and testing, I would also love if my doctors were trained in statistics and psychology, but that is not going to happen. They will rely on research reports and pharmaceutical information even if they ae grossly inaccurate.

What we must do is take the more responsibility for our Diabetes.

 

  1. Diabetes Research Is Leaning More Towards Ultimate Prevention Than Bettering Current Treatment

You should be glad there are billions of dollars being spent in Diabetes research. I believe all Diabetics would love a permanent cure. One particular research budget (click here for the report) shows less than 1% of the money is allocated is for behavior improvement which is a big problem right now. How many of us will have serious complications before they discover something?

I wonder if the medical research world is thinking too much of hitting a homerun than helping us with Diabetes right now. The bulk of their budgeting seems to say so.

The Center for Disease Control listed Diabetes as the 7th leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, with 79,535 death certificates listing it as the underlying cause of death, and in 2014, 76,488 people died of Diabetes in America, so it is growing. Also in 2015 a total of 252,806 death certificates listing diabetes as an underlying or contributing cause of death. There is no mention of Iatrogenic Disease: Iatrogenic Disease is defined as a disease that is caused by the medical treatment and is the 3rd most fatal disease in the USA.

The American Diabetes Association has spent $770 million dollar since 1952 on over 4600 research projects on Diabetes according to their research summary paper of 2016. (click here for the report). The National Health Institutes research workgroup (click here for DWG 1999 report) budgeted 1.2 Billion a year for 5 years to accelerate research on Diabetes calling the effort Conquering Diabetes. The are many other international organizations funding research on Diabetes. What are the results? More research. Historically major research breakthroughs for Diabetes take many years. Our last major breakthrough was in 1921 with discovery of insulin, which was 96 years ago.

There is strong evidence that tight control on your blood glucose levels can delay or prevent Diabetic complications. However, those techniques are hard to do across many years. From the NIH research workgroup only 1% of the budgeted money is going towards researching behavior changes, which can help to get the tight control we need now.  Most of the money and effort is on Biomedical discoveries.

There is no mention of the lives that were saved by a specific research project to date. Also, no mention of which research project saved a life. Why not? An important question that needs to be answered.

I’m not trying to tell you not to go to a hospital or a doctor’s office. What I am telling you is that we need to do more testing and checking with multiple opinions before you take the risk. It is about taking more responsibility for our illness. Hospitals as well as doctors have too little time to do a complete diagnostic and rely too heavily on current strategies. We need to provide them with the best individual information for them to make the best decisions.

International Diabetes Foundation estimated in 2015 415 million people worldwide have Diabetes and they estimate that 642 Million will have Diabetes in 2040. So, the problem is getting worse, not better.

Yet, we still have no cure and less agreement on treatment from all the experts and there are plenty of them.   They need to do their research and it is critical and we want it to continue. But it isn’t the whole story. The whole story is more than biomedical research and advice.  We are talking about a lifestyle changes of who we are. Changing who we are is deeper and more challenging than taking a medication.

  1. There Are Too Many Broken and Failed Diabetic Strategies

The treatment of diabetes has changed little over the past forty-five years. Although many new medications have been developed, patients still must watch their diets closely, exercise, and take insulin or oral medications throughout the day. And despite adhering to a strict treatment regimen, many continue to struggle to control their blood sugar.

What does reversing Diabetes really mean? Does it mean you never have to worry about Diabetes? Does it mean you can generate good blood sugar numbers if you adhere to some diet for some period of time. Reverse has some sense of permeance to it and these solutions are not permeant solutions.  There are so many books with unsubstantiated claims about reversing diabetes. I can reverse my blood glucose numbers to be excellent without eating for a week. But I cannot do that for many years. Yes, I believe we all would love a final cure. I have done my share of looking into these claims with a lot of hope. Maybe they work for a few people, but I doubt that it worked for the majority because the numbers are getting worse.

You might recognize some claims that go on and on why their solution is the best and their price the best, and are willing to give you rock solid guarantees because it is so true. There seems to be many people flashing their credential and claiming they have reversed Diabetes. And they are for the most part a short-term solution for at best for a small segment of the Diabetic population. They either have a poor understanding of statistics, or looking for an easy way to make money. I do believe there are some who believe their claims worked. We can keep an eye on their theory and test for it for yourself.

The media keeps reinforcing these broken strategies in its quest to create news, however, they have distorted the realities of Diabetes. They seem to just pass the medical advice to the public without challenging it. You might think with a problem that has been advertised by the medical profession of having over hundreds of millions of people affected that it would be bigger news than the political nonsense they seem to want to talk about.

Most of the current strategies recommend dieting. Dieting has been one of the most broken strategies I know of. It has a horrible track record. Dieting is a short-term solution at best and then you go up and down and usually end up higher than when you started. We are looking for a long-term solution not to lose weight in 20 or 30 days. Our complications are long-term consequences not short term.

  1. The Trust in Healthcare Is Withering Away

 It is becoming harder and harder to answer whether we trust our healthcare system when the government, medical and pharmaceutical industries, medical research and regulatory bodies, clinical practice, healthcare charities and associations, and national healthcare systems are hopeless entangled with biases and personal and profit seeking agendas.

It also seems like the mass media are feed a line from the medical community and they just pass it along to the public. They are not going to challenge them.

So, who is out there looking to help us?

Unfortunately, this is going to land on our shoulders. We have to take the responsibility to help ourselves to get all members in our health team to focus on our individual problems with Diabetes.

Here is some advice from Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, from his book “Doctoring Data: How to Sort Out Medical Advice From Medical Nonsense:” A book worth reading.

  • If there are large sums of money being made from selling a drug then it is absolutely 100% certain that there will be significant bias in the direction of the drug, in all research and publications.
  • Look for the people out there who have a completely different viewpoint from the mainstream.
  • Decide whether or not they sound sensible, and look at the facts and data they present.
  • Does it seem robust? If they pass these basic tests read what they have to say e.g. Ravnskov on the cholesterol hypothesis, Gøtzsche on breast cancer screening, Groves, Briffa and Taubes on weight loss. Lorin on Alzheimer’s, Graveline on statins and Alderman on salt.
  • At the very least you should find it interesting, and you will often gain a completely different insight into an area you may have thought was signed, sealed and delivered.
  • Trust yourself to understand what is being said. If you cannot, it is not you – it is them. If you cannot understand what is being said, it is most likely deliberate.
  • Be skeptical.

What Can’t We Do About It?

We are not going to change the way the research is being done. Nor will we be involved nor can change the budgeting and biases.

The Pharmaceuticals will continue on the way as they always have.  There will be massive claims and others trying to take advantage of us. Hiundr4eds of new medications toss at us.

We will not be able to challenge the established medical practices.

We will not stop the experts from being flatly wrong or biased.

So, What Can We Do?

Here is a famous quote form Samuel Johnson, “And take the case of a man who is ill. I call two physicians: they differ in opinion. I am not to lie down and die between them: I must do something.”

We cannot just lie down and take it.

Focus on your personal data and facts. Look for consistency in your data. Get multiple opinions from the experts and use common sense specifically about you.

Which means developing a network where there are contradictory opinions with experts not necessarily tied to big corporation or associations.

Let’s look at their numbers. Where do they contradict themselves?

The only real and effective thing we can do is to take responsible ourselves and build a network over time we can trust.

 

Educational Resources

If you don’t have your Diabetes education paid for from your medical plan, sign up for an inexpensive energetic presentation Diabetes, without becoming a super expert. Try Udemy video  Click Here To Check It Out!

Ask Doctor Bernstein’s Teleseminar are free. Whatever questions you have, he will answer them. Plus, you get to hear all the questions other Diabetics raise that might be applicable to you. Click Here to register

Here are a few books:

  1. Kendrick, Malcolm. Doctoring Data: How to sort out medical advice from medical nonsense. Columbus Publishing Ltd. This book really gets to the realities of how medical data is manipulated – a must read! Click here.
  2. Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide To Achieving Normal Blood Sugar by Richard K. Bernstein. He is the best for low carb diet and managing normal blood sugar levels. Click here.

 

  1. Blood Sugar 101: What They Don’t Tell You About Diabetes Jenny Ruhl. She has done wonderful research and has done a detailed analysis and it is worth a read. Click here.
  2. The Biography of Diabetes by Doctor Robert Tattersoll. This book will give you a sense of a brief medical history of Diabetes from the begging. Click here.

Educating yourself on Diabetes will be a step in taking responsibility for it.

There are many other resources we will bring up in future posts.

 

What’s Coming Next

We will be writing posts on the effects of belief systems, stress, lifestyle changes, questions for doctors, leading healthcare professionals and consequences of not taking responsibility.  These ae just a few. You can make suggestion where you might want us to go next. Just put it in the comments.

  Help Spread the Word

Let’s get more people involved in the conversation. Let’s learn from each other

Be well and take charge…

 

Diabetes Educational Resources: Five Ways To Take More Responsibility For Your Diabetes

Diabetes Educational Resources:

Five Ways To Take More Responsibility For Your Diabetes

Suddenly… everything fell into place. You don’t have control over doctors, the medical profession, the pharmaceutical companies, and the mass media messages. Despite this lack of control, you have a demanding responsibility. You still have to prevent or limit those serious complication of Diabetes.

Part of this prevention is to learn as much about the Disease as possible – without becoming a medical researcher. However, so much of what has been written about Diabetes is to discredit a previous theory or someone, then they show that their idea is better. However, I think that is the wrong direction. I believe the question is not who’s to blame? But always what needs to be done?

You need to take more responsibility for your Diabetes. This responsibility is to look beyond the typical medical advice, not to ignore it but to add to it. You are not looking to replace the existing theories nor to suggest you get off your doctor’s treatment. These educational alternatives are to enhance your overall blood sugar results over the long haul.

To take this responsibility, you have to look for the results and trust the data not the experts. And you have to trust common sense. The idea that glycemic control is not the major goal of diabetes therapy is so illogical that you have the right to demand an explanation from your health care team. You will not get a good one from the ADA or other agencies. You do need expert opinion but only results will tell you who the experts are.

Below are 5 ways you can take more responsibility for your Diabetes.

 

  1. You Can Take More Responsibility by Testing Your Foods. Finding Out Which Are The Right Foods For You To Eat And Which Foods To Avoid

You can test to see what your foods are doing to your blood glucose levels. You can achieve this simply and inexpensively by taking your blood glucose before the meal and every half an hour or every hour after the meals and see what the food does to your blood glucose. Also in the morning, test your fasting level. You are looking for a food that spikes very little and can quickly bring you back to blood glucose levels that were there before the meal.

You can learn a great deal from these tests. For example, I have learned from my tests that my glucose level will spike and on an average, it will take three and a half hours to get back to the blood glucose level I started with before the meal. Another test to beware of is, if I start to eat before the blood glucose level settled down a new spike will start from that point and go even higher cause the blood glucose to go even higher. These tests can tell you when you can snack and have your next meal. But it is your numbers not generalized numbers across a wide variation of people.

Another thing you can learn from these tests is that small meals with even less carbohydrates gives better results in controlling Diabetes. It will create a lower spike and return to numbers before the meals sooner. So, I do my best to have small meals which spikes a little every 3 and one-half hours. Find out what your best eating rhythm is by testing it.

These tests are not expense at all. It costs me 23 cents per test strip. I take 7 measurements- ever half an hour. The total cost per test is $1.61. If I take a measurement every hour instead it cost 69 cents per test. It takes 10 seconds to type each number totaling 70 seconds per test.  As you can see it is inexpensive and doesn’t consume a lot of time.

You would do these tests on foods that you will be consistently eating or foods you are uncertain of the effect they will have on you.  You can do it periodically or if your A1C results are off.

Also, we need to do testing, because food labels can be very misleading. The number of carbohydrates listed on the packaging does not always coincide with the actual test results.  Also at times you will be persuaded by research studies, reports or books. However, a most powerful way is to assess never assume. Test, test, and test.

This the biggest way you can take responsibility for your Diabetes.

An important note: Taking this testing responsibility is not to override a doctor. This is information to give to your doctor or help select directions that will be best for you. Don’ t eliminate the doctor advice they are an important member of your health team.

 

  1. You Can Take More Responsibility by Collecting A Larger Sample Of Tests For Your Doctor and You

 You need more tests to determine what is going on with your blood glucose levels. A test here and there will not work. You need a larger number of tests to determine what to do and where to go with your Diabetes. These larger number of tests can be very helpful for your doctor, which prevents you from going in a wrong direction.

Here is a story to illustrate what I mean.

A few years back I had a bad sinus infection. I called the doctor’s office for an appointment. They mentioned they had a cancellation but I had to be there in 25 minutes. I lived 30 minutes away. But I gave it try, thinking the doctor was never on time. I arrived close enough. It was a fast and stressful ride in. The nurse wanted to take my blood pressure. I explained to her that I was stressed out and suggested she take it when I settle down. She said she needed to take it before the doctor arrived. If the doctor wanted to take another one later he could. Guess what? The blood pressure was high.

The doctor commented on the high blood pressure. I gave him my spiel. He took it again and it was a little better – it didn’t settle down yet.  My doctor suggested a EKG test considering my age. The EKG had a double positive so that doctor suggested I see a cardiologist. The cardiologist looked at my record and said you have a high blood pressure and it concerned him, reading the number the nurse wrote weeks ago. He suggested a battery of heart exams which showed nothing. He then suggested blood pressure medication to get the blood pressure number down and he want to see me in a few weeks.   I was disturbed by the absolute lack of any rigor in their decision process or any effort of paying any attention to me. I took my blood pressure twice a day for the three intervening weeks. The overall blood pressure average was 128/80. When I arrived in the doctor’s office I insisted that he look at my blood pressure results. He then concluded that there was no problem. It was this data that they do not have the time to collect but I did, and it stopped me from having to take a mediation I did not need.

Take your daily tests and any other tests and prepare them for the doctors to look over. Make it simple enough for them to read it.

So, what I am heading towards here is taking charge. Testing your blood sugar and giving doctors more information. Doctors are very busy people and do not have the time to do through extensive testing, unless they perceive it as extremely dangerous. I am not trying to blame them. I’m trying to find a solution that is best for me and the doctor.  The answer is not to be passive but to collect as much information to give them to find out what really needs to be done.

That’s another way to take responsibility for your Diabetes.

 

  1. You Can Take More Responsibility by Find Who The Medical Advisors That You Should Follow.

There is a wide variety of Diabetes solutions and claims. You need a way to capture which ones are the right ones for you to follow.

Diabetes is not a single disease but a syndrome with at least fifty possible causes. It is very complex. Too much of what is written implies it is one disease with one cause, which is grossly misleading and possibly damaging to you. Rather than overlaying these medical generalizations over you as popular as they might be, the best and most accurate way would be to test yourself and have your doctor test you. Doctors are usually too focused on their theories, pharmaceutical beliefs and have little time for you or to talk about alternatives. I would love to have a statement from a Doctor if you do this and that you will not have complication with Diabetes. The liability issues are too high for them to state that.

For example, there are some Doctors out there that claim the problem with Diabetes has to do with having a high acidic PH level. I can believe this is true of some people, but is it true for you? This can simply be tested with Litmus paper, very inexpensive and simple to determine. You can check this out here.  If your PH level is okay no need to follow that advisor. If on the other hand your PH level is not good you might want to do more testing and looking at the suggestion of that advisor.

Some doctors are still recommending a high carbohydrate diet, this is extremely dangerous for me. Because I can measure what it does to my sugar levels. Whether it works for you needs to be tested.

The same is true for Doctors recommending certain diets and supplements. Again, they might work for some but you need to test for yourself if it is good for you. For me I have found very little help controlling my sugar levels from supplements.

Find out the advisors you need to follow. It is not about trusting these advisors but trusting the results.

In addition, even the major Diabetic associations and their advice needs to be tested.

This is another way to take responsibility is finding the leaders you need to follow.

 

  1. You Can Take More Responsibility by Using More Educational Resources

The amount of education out there is staggering and very difficult for one person to master it all, I know I tried reading hundreds of research studies, books and anything I could get my hands on.

You can use this website as an educational tool to help you. By either using the comments to make requests or sharing your views. Jump into this conversation. Make suggestions. Make corrections. Request answers to anything you need to understand.

If you don’t have your Diabetes education paid for from your medical plan, sign up for an inexpensive energetic presentation Diabetes, without becoming a super expert. Try Udemy video  Click Here To Check It Out!

Ask Doctor Bernstein’s Teleseminars are free and an excellent source of advice. Whatever questions you have, he will answer them. Plus, you get to hear all the questions other Diabetics raise that might be applicable to you. Click Here to register

Here are a few books:

  • Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide To Achieving Normal Blood Sugar by Richard K. Bernstein. He is the best for low carb diet and managing normal blood sugar levels. Click here.
  • Blood Sugar 101: What They Don’t Tell You About Diabetes Jenny Ruhl. She has done a wonderful job explaining the research and has done a detailed analysis and it is worth a read. Click here.
  • The Biography of Diabetes by Doctor Robert Tattersoll. This book will give you a sense of a brief medical history of Diabetes from the beginning. Click here

There are many other resources we will bring up in future posts.

Educating yourself on Diabetes will be a step in taking responsibility for it.

  1. You Can Take More Responsibility by Creating A Network Of People That Can Help.

Who else do you need on your health care team. Your doctor should line you up with an eye doctor, neurologist, kidney specialist, cardiologist, and a dentist.

You can also get your doctor to tell you what they have learned about Diabetes since your last visit.

Many doctor’s referrals need to have symptoms to recommend. Unfortunately, Diabetes is one of those diseases that once the symptoms arises you make be in more trouble than you like.

Having access to a dietitian would also be helpful. When I was on a low carbohydrate diet, I did get very good blood glucose numbers, but my overall nutrition deteriorated.  You need to balance both.

Another way to get a network is to follow a forum on Diabetes. There are many Diabetes forums where you can share you concerns with other Diabetics. If you want more simply just Google them.

Here are a few:

www.diabetesforum.com.

www.diabeticconnect.com

www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/

www.medhelp.org/forums/Diabetes

What’s Coming Next

We will be writing posts on the effects of belief systems, stress, lifestyle changes, questions for doctors, leading healthcare professionals and consequences of not taking responsibility.  These are just a few. You can make suggestion where you might want us to go next. Just put it in the comments.

  Help Spread the Word

Let’s get more people involved in the conversation. Let’s learn from each other

Be well and take charge…